vSphere Central – new resource centre

A little while back I caught the vSphere blog about vSphere Central being launched and ended up bookmarking the portal to have a look at a later date. I had totally forgot about it till today when I needed to look up the PSC topology diagrams and Google sent me to the new vSphere 6.5 Topology and Upgrade Planning Tool (more on this later). Turns out this portal is exactly like Storage Hub (resource portal for everything vSAN, SRM and storage related)!

Everything technical you need to know about vSphere and vCenter can be found on this portal:

  • How to install vCenter and vSphere
  • How to migrate to vCSA
  • How to upgrade vCenter and vSphere
  • vCenter and PSC architecture
  • SSL certificate management
  • PSC Deployment Types
  • Product Interoperability Matrix
  • All the new features in 6.5 explained (vCenter HA, Backup/Restore, etc)

It really is a great resource portal, and even better you can download each section as a PDF! Beats the documentation site for vSphere as it’s far more easier to navigate!

The content is in a range of formats, most of it is text taken from the technical pdf documents, but there are videos and walkthrough demos also scattered throughout the topics.

One of the things launched with vSphere Central was the vSphere 6.5 Topology and Upgrade Planning Tool.

This tool aims to help customers plan and execute both upgrades to vSphere 6.5 as well as new deployments. With this initial release, the tool is focused on the most common upgrade paths and deployments of vCenter Server 6.5. The tool works by asking a series of questions while providing some guidance along the way to help answer those questions eventually making some recommendations on topology and upgrade and deployment steps.

In the past I used to refer to the VMware KB on deployment topologies: https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2147672

Some of the guys in the vSphere technical marketing team then came up with the PSC Topology Decision Tree which was a large poster – https://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2016/04/platform-services-controller-topology-decision-tree.html

This tool was inspired by the Decision Tree poster and extends its capability.

What I especially like about the tool is that after answering a series of questions regarding how I’m planning to design the vCenter/PSC deployment it gives me a recommended Topology diagram and then explains the steps to go about deploying the solution:

topology

Anyways, it’s a great tool…. and the portal is a brilliant collection of resources! Go use it! Bookmark it now…! =)

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Horizon Cloud on Azure – GA

Interesting tie up between VMware and Microsoft…. is this the beginning of a new relationship? Have Microsoft woken up (post-VMworld) to the awesome VMware Cloud on AWS and realised they also want in on the party? (although if i’m honest this partnership has been bubbling in the background for a while now).

Anyways, after a round of beta testing in the US, Horizon Cloud has now gone GA on Azure: https://blogs.vmware.com/euc/2017/10/vmware-horizon-cloud-on-microsoft-azure-now-available.html

When Horizon Cloud was launched earlier this year, the concept of enabling end-user organisations the ability to deploy feature-rich VDIs and applications across multiple deployment options was very promising. From a single management console, end users are able to deploy virtual desktops onto on-premise infrastructure, to the Cloud, or a hybrid combination of both. TBH, some of this concept was already available in Horizon Air (which came out of the Desktone acquisition), but this is an evolution of that product.

Horizon Cloud is a cross-cloud architecture for VDI – much like how Cloud Foundation is for SDDC – however, in the case of Horizon Cloud, the Portal which acts as the control/management plane resides solely in the cloud (you get a choice with Cloud Foundation’s SDDC Manager), administrators log into this portal to deploy and manage their VDI sessions – whether on prem or cloud.

3 offerings currently:

  1. Horizon Cloud Hosted – so VDI infrastructure provided by VMware (IBM Cloud is currently the only provider), where you just choose the type of desktop and apps to deploy via the portal – DaaS. Infrastructure management/maintenance/SLAs are fully undertaken by VMware.
  2. Horizon Cloud On-Premise – based on HCI technology and acts like a stepping stone to Cloud VDI. VDI stored locally on prem, but management is all from the Cloud, perfect for data-residency issues, for end-users who require high performance VDI, and for IT admins who wish to have greater control over their VDI infrastructure.
  3. Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure – delivering RDS VDI and apps hosted in Azure datacentres. Connecting a customers Azure IaaS subscription to Horizon Cloud. So VMware manages the VDI aspects and Microsoft the underlying infrastructure. Also worth noting that currently only Azure deployments support vGPU-accelerated infrastructure.

Whatever the deployment option, customers will get a VDI infrastructure that’s easily scalable (whether cloud or on-prem) and easy to deploy. The best part is you get the flexibility of subscription based pricing.

With Horizon Cloud on Azure, you can import gold images from Azure marketplace which will then be configured and deployed for Horizon.

One key element of the Horizon Cloud technology is justin-time (JIT) provisioning of virtual desktops and applications. Using the configurations made in the cloud-control
plane, Horizon Cloud leverages VMware App Volumes, User Environment Manager, and VMware Instant Clone technologies to assemble personalised virtual desktop and application environments when an end user logs in, giving IT administrators high flexibility in leveraging the infrastructure.

I like the idea that if I have a persistent VDI deployed in Horizon Cloud, then I can access that VDI or hosted apps whether I’m in the office or on the move (as long as there is data connectivity). I can start writing a document in the office, then leave it open mid-sentence as I leave the office, or jump on a train – I can even power off my endpoint device – then I can re-establish the session and carry on without any interruption… an Always On desktop!

I also like the idea that with Azure, I could deploy a VDI session to the datacentre in the UK, then as I jump on a flight to the US I can re-deploy that VDI session to an Azure datacentre in the US. Although, I’m not quite sure you can migrate live VDI sessions between datacentres yet – I haven’t seen any articles that say you can live-migrate VDIs (but one would think this would be the ideal end-goal).

 

Hopefully this new VMware-Microsoft partnership will lead onto Microsoft accepting to run Cloud Foundation on Azure (VMware Cloud on Azure) which will then give end users the freedom to move their workloads from on prem to either AWS or Azure!! Almost Cross-Cloud (just need GCP to step up).