vSphere/vCenter 6.5 released

So post VMworld, I wrote a long article about what’s new for vSphere 6.5 which I was hoping would be published on SearchVMware.com…. unfortunately I’m still waiting on it to be published, last I heard the article was too long and they were splitting it up into two articles! ¬_¬”

Anyways, whilst I wait for the article to be published, I’ll give a quick summary of things I’ve learnt about the new vSphere/vCenter 6.5 that was released 2 days ago.

  • New HTML5 vSphere Client
  • Fully Integrated vSphere Update Manager and AutoDeploy with vCenter Server Appliance
  • Native High Availability for the vCSA
  • Native backup/restore for vCSA
  • Built-in monitoring web interface for the vCSA
  • Over 2x increase in scale and 3x in performance
  • Easy to migrate from Windows vCenter to vCSA
  • Client Integration Plugin for the vSphere Web Client is no longer required
  • The vCSA deployment installer can be run on Windows, Mac and Linux
  • The installer now supports install, upgrade, migrate and restore
  • vSphere API Explorer
  • VM Encryption / Encrypted vMotion
  • Secure Boot (for ESXi host and VM)
  • VMware Tools 10.1 and 10.0.12 (for older guest OSes that are out of support)
  • Multi-factor authentication with Smartcard or SecurID
  • VMFS-6 (4k drive support in 512e mode – emulating 512 sectors)
  • Automatic Space Reclamation – VAAI UNMAP now automatic and integrated it UI
  • VVOLs 2.0 plus VASA 3.0
  • vSphere HA is now known as vSphere Availability, enhancements to Admission Control
  • HA Orchestrated Restarts (adding in dependencies when HA restarts a VM)
  • Proactive HA (when host components are failing they are put into a quarantine mode)
  • Enhancements to DRS (VM distribution, CPU Over-commit, Network aware)
  • Predictive-DRS if vRealize Operations 6.4 is deployed (forecasted trends will kick off DRS)
  • vSphere Replication enhancements (now 5min RPOs like vSAN)

 

To find out more information, head along to the following:

 

In addition to the GA of vSphere/vCenter 6.5 there were a load of other releases on the same day:

 

I’m still waiting on the launch of vRealize Automation 7.2 and NSX 6.3….. those should be imminent as well!

As always, all downloads are available via the My VMware Portal.

Advertisements

Updating VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager to 5.5

So after updating my vCenter Server Appliance to 5.5, the next obvious choice was to update Site Recovery Manager and the vSphere Replication Appliance.

Note: the way I’m upgrading my demo environment is not according to best practice…. it’s merely a quick way to document and try out the upgrade process!

If you’re planning an upgrade of your production environment, then there is a recommended order for the upgrades:

  1. Upgrade vCenter Server on the protected site.
  2. Upgrade SRM Server on the protected site.
  3. Upgrade the storage replication adapters (SRA) on the protected site.
  4. Upgrade the vSphere Replication appliance on the protected site.
  5. Upgrade any additional vSphere Replication server instances on the protected site.
  6. Upgrade vCenter Server on the recovery site.
  7. Upgrade SRM Server on the recovery site.
  8. Upgrade the storage replication adapters (SRA) on the recovery site.
  9. Upgrade the vSphere Replication appliance on the recovery site.
  10. Upgrade any additional vSphere Replication server instances on the recovery site.
  11. Configure the connection between the SRM sites and vSphere Replication appliances.
  12. Verify that your protection groups and recovery plans are still valid.
  13. Upgrade ESXi Server on the recovery site.
  14. Upgrade ESXi Server on the protected site.
  15. Upgrade the virtual hardware and VMware Tools on the virtual machines on the ESXi hosts.

When you upgrade Site Recovery Manager, there’s no real need to do anything to your database as the upgrade preserves all information in the current SRM DB (so basically preserving your protection groups, inventory mappings and recovery plans, plan run history, etc).
However, if you’re not running 5.1 or later then you will need to create a 64bit ODBC system DSN (SRM 5.0.x used a 32bit ODBC DSN). Any deployment of SRM earlier than 5.0 will require a two-step upgrade, first to 5.0.x then to 5.5.
(Note: Don’t upgrade vCenter Server directly from 4.1.x to 5.5, as this will cause the upgrade of SRM to fail when moving from 4.1.x to 5.0.x… this is because SRM 5.0.x cannot connect to vCenter Server 5.5)

Fortunately I’m going to step through an upgrade from SRM 5.1, so my ODBC is already in place!

1. On the SRM server, start the installer.
SRM1

2. Choose where you wish to install the new version of SRM.
SRM2

3. Choose to install vSphere Replication if you’re using it (Which I am).SRM3

4. Enter the vCenter Server credentials (the installer will notice SRM is already installed and pick up the IP address of the vCenter Server).
SRM4

5. Accept the SSL certificate warning.
SRM5

6. Once the installer connects to your vCenter Server, it will identify that you already have a registered extension for SRM. Click Yes to overwrite the old extension.
SRM6

7. Select the type of authentication to be used (in my case I’m letting SRM auto-generate a self-signed certificate).
SRM7

8. Enter the Organisation and OU in order for SRM to generate the certificate.
SRM8

9. Enter an administrator’s email address in order to obtain SRM generated alerts.
SRM9

10. The installer will pick up the ODBC connection and request you to enter the existing SRM DB user information.
SRM10

11. Select Use existing database, choosing the other option will wipe everything from your existing SRM deployment!
SRM11

12. Click Install to kick off the upgrade.
SRM12

13. Once installation is complete, you will need to upgrade the vSphere Client Plug-in for SRM. You will need to uninstall the old SRM plug-in from within Windows Control Panel->Programs.
SRM13

14. Once complete. Fire up vSphere Client and install the new plug-in via Plugins->Manage Plug-ins
SRM14

 

Job done…… now to upgrade the existing vSphere Replication Appliance…. You can upgrade the vRA either using vSphere Update Manager, via the online repository, or via an offline repository (like an ISO image).
Unfortunately like the VCA, I couldn’t find an 5.5 update using the online repository so had to mount the vRA 5.5 ISO image to the vRA and update via CDROM.

1. Log into the vRA management console (https://vra-IP:5480 or http://vra-IP:8080 if its vRA 5.0.x) and select the Update tab. Select Settings and then choose Use CDROM Updates and click Save Settings.
vra1

2. Click on Status and it should display any update files it has found in the mounted ISO image. Click Install Updates.
 vra2

3. Once update is complete, you will need to reboot the vRA…. don’t forget to unmount the ISO image…..
vra3 

 

Voila….. it’s as easy as that!