VMworld 2017 US General Session Day 2

….. This update is a bit late going up because Tuesday evenings is 5-a-side footie for me…. =)

So what was the General Session on Day 2 all about… well it kicked off with a fireside chat between Pat Gelsinger and Michael Dell, answering a few questions that were submitted the previous evening from attendees. In my opinion there wasn’t any major revelations or probing questions asked/answered, what we do know is that Michael Dell likes Peanut Butter & Chocolate… =P

It’s interesting that Dell thinks that we’re in for some exciting times with AI and machine learning…. although he didn’t quite pin his flag like Zuckerberg and Musk recently… =)
The amount of data created from IoT is stupendous, and the possibilities of using that data are endless – however, companies need to start thinking about how to use the vast amounts of data they have to try and improve processes, products and services – if they don’t then they could be left behind (Just like Elastic Sky Pizza were)!

However, one of the more memorable quotes from Pat was that “Today is the slowest day of technological evolution of the rest of your life!” Great quote, and how true it is…. In IT we live in an ever-changing world!

One thing I did pick up on was VMware Skyline – a new and innovative support technology which will offer pro-active support for VMware solutions. It will consist of a Collector appliance that end-users deploy, it then sits there securely collecting environmental-data from different VMware components (such as configuration, performance, and product usage) whilst performing machine-learning analytics to ensure the overall solution functions correctly. If it detects any changes, events or patterns that will cause a deviation from best practices or validate designs then it will alert the customer. Skyline is aimed at improving support experience through data analytics.

Both Pat and Dell were then joined on stage by Rob Mee (CEO of Pivotal) – it was really interesting to hear that Pivotal Cloud Foundry was being used in over 50% of the Fortune 500 – I wonder what the percentage is in the UK FTSE? Pivotal has be “pivotal” (excuse the pun) in helping enterprises and their digital transformation – how to run legacy production workloads alongside developing new cloud-native applications, yet still providing the availability and security whilst also reducing cost! Pivotal Cloud Foundry addresses all these issues.

The biggest announcement of the day was the unveiling of Pivotal Container Services (PKS) – a partnership between VMware, Pivotal and Google Cloud. Pivotal has been working with Google for a while – Project Kubo – and now with the partnership with VMware, PKS will enable enterprises to deliver production-ready Kubernetes on VMware vSphere and Google Cloud Platform (GCP), with compatibility to Google Container Engine (GKE) – all secured by – yup you guessed it – NSX. Pat went on to say that they’re not stopping there and will start to integrate other VMware products such as vRealize Automation and Operations, along with Wavefront (who VMware acquired in May – it’s a “real-time metrics monitoring and streaming analytics platform designed for developers to optimize their clouds and modern applications that rely on containers and microservices”)

PKS-Image

Pat, Dell and Rob were joined on stage by Google’s Sam Ramji (VP of Product Management – Developer Platforms). It’s interesting how Google are pouring in vast amounts of their knowledge on containers into Kubernetes – a way of giving back to the community! Sam also announced that Pivotal and VMware were to become as Platinum Members of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation – home of Kubernetes.

The rest of the General Session involved a fictitious company called “Elastic Sky Pizza” which was stuck in the past and needed assistance in transforming their business. Loads of demos and presentations showing how VMware’s suite of Cloud products work – including PKS, AppDefense, NSX, Pulse IoT (Edge LIOTA).

 

PKS looks amazing, but I do still think that containers is an enterprise play – which kind of goes against one of the questions during the fireside chat about looking after the SMB market… this is probably going to be priced above what SMBs can afford!

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VMworld 2017 US General Session Day 1

If like me, you’re stuck in a sweltering London enjoying the bank holiday and watching the Game of Thrones season 7 finale, you may have forgotten that over in Vegas the city is just getting over the big fight of Mayweather vs McGregor and is now inundated with people looking to attend VMworld 2017 US.

It’s great that VMware live stream their keynotes, as it gives everyone an opportunity to hear first hand what VMworld will be about this year and also what is being announced!

And it’s of no surprise that VMware have continued to strengthen their vision on “Any Device, Any Application, Any Cloud” with the keynote by Pat Gelsinger. Whilst heterogeneous is a great thing that leads to the consumerisation of IT, it plays havoc with IT admins who’s key focus is to contain and secure a company’s data – and it’s worth noting how much emphasis is being placed on security within VMware – NSX is intrinsic to every solution that was mentioned during the keynote!

Vision

The first thing that was covered was how the digital transformation is affecting end users – the goal for any company is to ensure that their employees are well connected, yet the challenge is a complex one when you realise how many different technologies an end user has access to – smartphones, tablets, laptops – even smartwatches and cars now! So how do you deliver an unified workspace securely across multiple technologies?

Simple – Workspace ONE – piecing it all together to give companies a “consumer simple but enterprise secure” solution. Delivered in 3 areas:

  1. Apps and Identity – applications with a consistent feel across multiple devices. Secured by a common identity framework with a simple Single Sign-on experience.
  2. Management and Security – IT in control, delivering consistent management & security. Drastically improving  tasks that were previously costly, time consuming, and resource intensive, whilst still in control of data by combining identity and device management to enforce Data Security and Endpoint Compliance.
  3. Desktop and Mobile – Device Management and Compliance provided by AirWatch Unified Endpoint Management, protecting sensitive data as well as conditional access to how that data can be consumed by end-users.

workspaceone

Next Pat went on to explain that virtualisation has led to end-users deploying a private cloud within their own data centres, yet making such a transition is not an easy step – deployment isn’t straight forward, lifecycle management and day 2 operations isn’t always easy, and trying to secure different technologies of a private cloud is painful!

VMware’s goal is to “make Private Cloud Easy and that’s where Cloud Foundation comes along – a fully integrated SDDC stack that ‘just works’…. simple… agile… secure! version 2.2 was announced and is now GA.

Pat was then joined by Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS, to announce the General Availability of VMware Cloud on AWS. Announced as a tech preview at last years VMworld, it should be noted that it’s currently only available today in the US West Coast region Availability Zone, it will then be rolled out across the East Coast AZ before rolling out to the rest of the AWS global AZs by the end of 2018. So I guess we’re going to expect it in the UK late 2017/early 2018!

VMware Cloud on AWS allows you to seamlessly take a workload running on vSphere in your data centre and migrate it to AWS Public Cloud running a VMware stack – using the same tools (vCenter Server) to manage both your private and your public cloud workloads from a single pane of glass! A consistent feel no matter where your workload resides. What Andy Jassy said was correct – in the past customers hated the fact that if they wanted to consume public cloud, there was no easy way of migrating workloads across without some form of translation occurring. It was also painful and costly to manage as you couldn’t use a single tool to manage both private and public cloud.

VMware’s Cloud Strategy is as follows:

cloud

The first 7 VMware Cloud Services were announced as available for consumption.

VMware Cloud Services

NSX Cloud is an interesting service that addresses networking and security operational challenges inherent with using multiple public clouds. Unfortunately at launch it’s only available on AWS to protect EC2 workloads (ie native AWS workloads – not vSphere workloads which is what VMware Cloud on AWS gives). It differs from on-premise NSX as it is delivered as a service and managed by VMware.

As I previously said, NSX is a key foundation to every solution at VMware currently:

nsx

Security is hugely important… and Pat breaks it down into 3 components:

  1. the need to build it into the infrastructure
  2. the need to integrate with the current security vendor ecosystem
  3. the need to ensure good cyber hygiene and ensure security policies are in place. The 5 pillars of Cyber Hygiene are:
    • Least Privilege
    • Micro-segmentation
    • Encryption
    • Multi-factor authentication
    • Patching

Two years ago, VMware first began talking about the concept of the “Goldilocks Zone” where the hypervisor sits at the ideal location in the network to improve security. During the keynote VMware announced a new product named AppDefense which looks to be the fruition of Project Goldilocks.

AppDefense allows a virtual machine to learn its manifest and understand what is a good and secure process, it’s then able to determine whether the runtime behaviour of a VM or application deviates from its intended state. Finally it’s able to trigger an automated/orchestrated response to remediate or quarantine any detected anomalies.

appdefense

 

Strange that searching the VMworld Europe Content Catalog for AppDefense doesn’t bring up any sessions…. which is a shame as I was hoping to schedule a session after hearing the keynote and reading about it.

Roll on Day 2….

 

VMware sells off vCloud Air to OVH

Hmm…. so that was an interesting announcement from VMware last week!….. although if I’m honest it makes perfect sense!

OVH Group announcing it’s intent to acquire the vCloud Air Business from VMware: https://www.vmware.com/radius/vmware-cloud-air-evolves/

Last year when VMware announced their tie up with AWS – vCloud on AWS – many had already started wondering what that partnership would do to VMware’s own cloud offering. The talking point was made more real when VMware also announced their Cross-Cloud Architecture which would allow a customer to choose which cloud platform to deploy their workloads onto – all from a single common operating environment. Then to make things worse, VMware announced VMware Cloud Foundation on IBM Cloud (or what was Softlayer)… an SDDC stack running VMware goodies on IBM Cloud compute!

That triple whammy pretty much made everyone think that vCloud Air’s time was up!!

I had a number of discussions at VMworld Europe last year where we talked about whether VMware would just shut down vCloud Air, or would they migrate it all onto AWS. Although the general consensus was that maybe they would sell off/spin off that part of their business – after all, VMware is a software business and vCloud Air was always seen as a ‘weird’ sibling…. not to mention that it competed against all it’s vCAN (VSPP) partners who were offering their own cloud services built on VMware technology!

I guess there’s no shame in what VMware are doing, Cisco, Dell and HP tried and failed to do what Amazon and Google are doing well at… although surprisingly Microsoft have managed to get Azure up and running well!

In a way, VMware are getting rid of what they probably saw as a hefty investment on infrastructure and hosting for little returns (I doubt there were many customers using vCloud Air to justify the expense of keeping it). Makes more sense to sell it to an existing cloud provider who knows how to sell Public Cloud services and IaaS! Although, I kind of have to wonder what OVH will do given VMware hosted vCloud Air in Equinix/Telstra data centres around the world….. guessing they’ll run down the contract with those providers and bring it all back in house!

In my opinion, selling off vCloud Air is probably a smart move….. VMware’s vision is to enable a customer to run “Any Application on Any Cloud, accessed by Any Device”, and it was going to be difficult to be Cloud-Agnostic if they owned a Public Cloud service! The whole Cross-Cloud Architecture would have produced a conflict of interest if they kept vCloud Air…. now that they’re shot of it, they can concentrate on pushing out their vCloud stack onto Azure and maybe even GCP given that they’re well on their way with the AWS partnership. Why try and beat them at their own game? It’s far easier to embrace them and partner!!

VMware are positioning themselves to be the broker of cloud services…. a single management point that allows end users to decide which public cloud is best for their workloads! In a way it’s a clever move, firstly because it puts the decision-making back with the end user, and secondly it now means that VMware can state that it’s the only virtualisation company that doesn’t tie you into a single cloud vendor (much like how Microsoft tries to ram Azure down the throat of Hyper-V customers).

Interesting times ahead……

vShield Endpoint with vSphere 6.0 – Explaining the confusion around the product range!

So I had a customer ask me what was going on with vShield Edge and vCloud Networking & Security, and whether the products are still available or has NSX replaced them…. and what is with this vShield Endpoint feature?

Anyways, after explaining my take on vShield and vCNS I decided to do a bit more digging into vShield Endpoint and why there has been so much confusion with the product range regarding licensing, support, and availability of the products!

I came across this great blog post by Josh Townsend which pretty much explains the history behind vShield, vCNS and NSX and also talks about how you can deploy vShield Endpoint. Rather than me regurgitating what he wrote, I’ll advise you to definitely click through to his blog and have a read! Hopefully all will become clear!

http://vmtoday.com/2015/05/vshield-endpoint-vsphere-6-0/

vSphere 6.0 update 1 and Virtual SAN 6.1 released (plus other goodies)

…. and so just a week after VMworld 2015 US, VMware have released vSphere 6.0 update 1 and a number of other product updates….. without ANY fanfare….. it was such a silent release that the first I heard about it was when all the community bloggers started posting up announcements!

Anyways, here are the products released today:

vSphere ESXi & vCenter Server 6.0 update 1 Download
vSphere ESXi 6.0 update 1 Release Notes
vCenter Server 6.0 update 1 Release Notes

Note: There has already been a KB released regarding the upgrade:
https://blogs.vmware.com/kb/2015/09/alert-important-information-before-upgrading-to-vsphere-6-0-update-1.html

In addition to vSphere and vCenter Server, all the other components of vSphere/vCenter received an update:
vSphere Update Manager 6.0 update 1
vSphere Replication 6.1

vSphere Data Protection 6.1
vRealize Orchestrator Appliance 6.0.3

The good news is that VUM is now integrated into the Web Client!! =)

SRM got an update as well:
Site Recovery Manager 6.1 Download
Site Recovery Manager 6.1 Release Notes

This brings some cool stuff to SRM like:

  • Policy-based management – offering New protection groups using vSphere storage policies for protection of VMs.
  • Support for Auto-mapping of stretched NSX networks (using Universal Logical Switches).
  • Support for stretched storage (like EMC VPLEX), that now includes the ability to use vMotion to move VMs from Site A to Site B.

Although no news on whether Site Recovery Manager Air (for vCloud Air DR) has been launched yet….. =(

Most importantly is the launch of Virtual SAN 6.1:
Virtual SAN 6.1 Download
Virtual SAN 6.1 Release Notes

This new update now:

  • Supports stretched VSAN clusters that span two geographic locations to protect data from site failures or loss of network connection (using the feature of Fault Domains).
  • Support for 2 node ROBO configurations.
  • Enhanced Replication (RPO of 5mins with vSphere Replication)
  • Support for SMP-FT
  • New hardware options (such as support for the new flash devices: Intel NVMe, Diablo UltraDIMM)

Also loads of updates to the vRealize Suite of products:
vRealize Operations Manager 6.1.0 Download
vRealize Operations Manager 6.1.0 Release Notes
vRealize Log Insight 3.0 Download
vRealize Log Insight 3.0 Release Notes
vRealize Automation 6.2.3 Download
vRealize Automation 6.2.3 Release Notes
vRealize Code Stream 1.2.0 Download
vRealize Code Stream 1.2.0 Release Notes
vRealize Business Standard 6.2.3 & vRealize Business Advanced/Enterprise 8.2.3 Download
vRealize Business 6.2.3 Release Notes
vRealize Business Advanced/Enterprise 8.2.3 Release Notes

In addition, the new version of vCloud Director was released for Service Providers (no long available for end-users) which offers vSphere 6.0 and NSX 6.1.4 support, there are also some minor Org vDC template and vApp Enhancements.
VMware vCloud Director 8.0 for Service Providers Download
VMware vCloud Director 8.0 Release Notes

Horizon also got a minor update earlier this month:
Horizon 6 version 6.2 Download
Horizon 6 version 6.2 Release Notes

Improvements to vCloud Air Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

When DRaaS was launched by VMware the backend of last year, everyone was pretty excited about the ability to ‘get rid’ off their secondary/DR site and offload it all into the cloud – A subscription based DR solution which would allow customers to decrease their Capex and offset it with an Opex model.

It kind of boils down to the old accounting argument regarding whether Capex or Opex is a better spending model for IT Infrastructure. Now I’m not an accountant, nor am I pretending to understand the ins-and-outs of tax-deductible benefits, but from my understanding an Opex model is more tax efficient – especially on the P&L balance sheet. (Obviously correct me if I’m wrong!)

Usually a Capex model means:

  1. You require a large amount of cash outlay to purchase all the goods
  2. You have to make an ‘educated’ guess to estimate future capacity needs
  3. Once you’ve purchased the goods, you’re pretty much stuck with it, despite advancements in technology of company growth

However, some CFOs still think that Opex is more expensive as they only consider the cost of the physical server required for the applications.
Whenever you have to do any sort of capex/opex comparison, you have to take the direct costs such as power, cooling, floor space, storage and IT resources to manage the physical hardware.
Plus then there’s all the indirect costs – network and storage, procurement and accounting costs, transportation/logistics, etc. Once all these other costs that accompany the physical tin are considered, it becomes a different argument!

Anyways, I digress…..

So When VMware launched vCloud Air DR, I thought it would become a viable solution for customers looking to get rid of their DR site….. but upon closer inspection there were some flaws in the solution – namely trying to automate your DR (like SRM) and the process of failback once your primary site comes back online (the vCloud Connector process was clunky and required VMs to be powered off before a full data copy occurs back to the primary site – not a viable solution as who would switch off their VMs in order to copy them back over? And we’re talking hours offline if you’re copying a 100GB VM over a 100Mb link!!).

Quick overview of the benefits:

  • RPO configured on individual VMs from 15mins to 24hrs.
  • DR protection is per VM (allowing individual VMs to be failed over)
  • Secure asynchronous replication of VMs (using vSphere replication)
  • Self-service DR testing of VMs (up to 2 tests per 12mth period with a 7 day testing period)
  • Guaranteed resource availability (especially during DR failover)
  • Monitoring and management via Web Client
  • Integrates seamlessly with vSphere environments
  • VMs can run for up to 30 days in a failover scenario without incurring additional costs
  • Ability to transition out of the DRaaS into vCloud Air Private or Dedicated Cloud
  • SLA of 4hrs or less

DRaaS

I’m happy to say that the current release now offers Native Failback using vSphere Replication to reverse the replication from vCloud Air DR into your on-premise environment. Unlike vCloud Connector, this does not require the VMs to be powered off during the reverse replication. It can also be managed from your Web Client – similar to how you originally setup the replication process to vCloud Air.

In addition to this, VMware are now offering Multiple Point-in-Time Recovery using the ability of vSphere replication to retain multiple recovery points, up to a total of 24! Great if you need to recover to an earlier point in time if the latest replication set is corrupt or the VM experiences errors.

Finally, Automation is now possible with full integration with vRealize Orchestrator via a plug-in. This will allow you to create multiple VM recovery plans and automate the failover process – similar to what SRM can do.

For more information about the new version of vCloud Air DR, head along to VMware’s blog announcement: What’s new with vCloud Air DR?

For more information about the vCloud Air offerings, point your browsers here: vCloud Air

Should IT be Cloud?

A while back I was asked to write an article about Cloud Computing for my company’s blog site…… which they decided to publish during my snowboarding trip to Serre Chevalier! (Hence the late publication on my blog).

http://www.mtibytes.com/post/Should-IT-be-Cloud

Have a read and feel free to let me know your thoughts, whether you agree or disagree on my points. =)

In the mean time….. here’s a quick picture of my snowboarding trip…. ;oP

Day 2:
20150211_102334
Final day white out!
20150214_101039

vCloud Air Tutorials

Want to know more about the VMware vCloud Air services? Well pop along to the tutorial page in the vCloud portal! =)

http://vcloud.vmware.com/uk/using-vcloud-air/tutorials

Excellent material for how to use the vCloud Air services, how to setup and deploy VMs if you purchase a Dedicated or Virtual Private Cloud….. and most importantly how the vCloud Air Disaster Recovery works (which was what I was after).

We’ve had a huge number of customers interested in DRaaS and vCloud Air DR seems a very viable solution!